lev_lafayette's blog

Image Watermarks in Batch

A common need among those who engage in large scale image processing is to assign a watermark of some description to their images. Further, so I have been told, it is preferable to have multiple watermarks that have slightly different kerning depending on whether the image is portrait or landscape. Thus there are two functions to this script, one for separating the mass of images into a directory into whether they are portrait or landscape, and a second to apply the appropriate watermark. The script is therefore structured as follows and witness the neatness and advantages of structured coding, even in shell scripts. I learned a lot from first-year Pascal programming.

eResearchAustralasia 2020

With annual conferences since 2007 eResearchAustralasia was hosted online this year, due to the impacts of SARS-CoV-2. Typically conferences are held along the eastern seaboard of Australia, which does bring into question the "-asia" part of the suffix. Even the conference logo highlights Australia and New Zealand, to the exclusion of the rest of the word. I am not sure how eResearch NZ feels about this encroachment on their territory.

Contributing To the International HPC Certification Forum

As datasets grow in size and complexity faster than personal computational devices are able to perform more researchers seek HPC systems as a solution to their computational problems. However, many researchers lack the familiarity with the environment for HPC, and require training. As the formal education curriculum has not yet responded sufficiently to this pressure, leaving HPC centres to provide basic training.

Spartan: From Experimental Hybrid towards a Petascale Future

Previous presentations to eResearch Australiasia described the implementation of Spartan, the University of Melbourne’s general- purpose HPC system. Initially, this system was small but innovative, arguably even experimental. Features included making extensive use of cloud infrastructure for compute nodes, OpenStack for deployment, Ceph for the file system, ROCE for network, Slurm as the workload manager, EasyBuild and LMod, etc.

Monitoring HPC Systems Against Compromised SSH

Secure Shell is a very well established cryptographic network protocol for accessing operating network services and is the typical way to access high-performance computing (HPC) systems in preference to various unsecured remote shell protocols, such as rlogin, telnet, and ftp. As with any security protocol it has undergone several changes to improve the strength of the program, most notably the improvement to SSH-2 which incorporated Diffie-Hellman key exchange. The security advantages of SSH are sufficient that there are strong arguments that computing users should use SSH "everywhere".

Process Locally, Backup Remotely

Recently, a friend expressed a degree of shock that I could pull old, even very old, items of conversation from emails, Facebook messenger, etc., with apparent ease. "But I wrote that 17 years ago". They were even dismayed when I revealed that this all just stored as plain-text files, suggesting that perhaps I was like a spy, engaging in some sort of data collection on them by way of mutual conversations.

For my own part, I was equally shocked by their reaction. Another night of fitful sleep, where feelings of self-doubt percolate. Is this yet another example that I'm have some sort of alien psyche? But of course, this is not the case, as keeping old emails and the like as local text files is completely normal in computer science. All my work and professional colleagues do this.

What is the cause of this disparity between the computer scientist and the ubiquitous computer user? Once I realised that the disparity of expected behaviour was not personal, but professional, there was clarity. Essentially, the convenience of cloud technologies and their promotion of applications through Software as a Service (SaaS) has led to some very poor computational habits among general users that have significant real-world inefficiencies.

Batch Image Processing

It may initially seem counter-intuitive, but sometimes one needs to process an image file without actually viewing the image file. This is particularly the case if one has a very large number of image files and a uniform change is required. The slow process is to open the images files individually in whatever application one is using and make the changes required, save and open the next file and make the changes required, and so forth. This is time-consuming, boring, and prone to error.

Using Live Linux to Save and Recover Your Data

There are two types of people in the world; those who have lost data and those who are about to. Given that entropy will bite eventually, the objective should be to minimise data loss. Some key rules for this backup, backup often, and backup with redundancy. Whilst an article on that subject will be produced, at this stage discussion is directed to the very specific task of recovering data from old machines which may not be accessible anymore using Linux.

Notes on Installing Ubuntu 20 VM on an MS-Windows 10 Host

Some thirteen years ago I worked with Xen virtual machines as part of my day job, and gave a presentation at Linux Users of Victoria on the subject (with additional lecture notes). A few years after that I gave another presentation on the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI), itself which (indirectly) led to a post on Linux and MS-Windows 8 dual-booting. All of this now leads to a some notes on using MS-Windows as a host for Ubuntu Linux guest machines.

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