About Lev Lafayette

Crocodile Logo

Lev Lafayette has an MSc (Information Systems) from Salford University, and an MBA (Technology Management) from the Chifley Business School, where he was on the Dean's List. He also has a Graduate Certificate in Project Management from the same institution, and an honours degree from Murdoch University in Politics, Philosophy and Sociology which is commented upon by the Vice-Chancellor of the time. Many years later he completed a Graduate Certificate in Adult and Tertiary Education at the same institution. He is currently undertaking a Masters in Higher Education at the University of Otago.

He is a certified PRINCE2 Practioner, and an Adult and Workplace Trainer. Clearly not satisfied with two masters degree, he's started a third, this time a Master of Higher Education at the University of Otago. With a interdisciplinary approach, Lev's interests include the political implementation of universal pragmatics, the relationship between communications technology and society, and comparative economic systems. On again and off again, he plods his way through completing a PhD in Social Theory as well.

Professionally however, Lev is an experienced systems administrator, specialising in the Linux operating system and scientific applications, a project manager, systems engineer, and quality management systems coordinator, specifically for ISO 9001 (Quality assurance) and ISO 270001 (Information Technology Security). He also does a lot of training for researchers and technical staff in Linux, High Performance Computing, mathematical programming, Postgresql, and related subjects, with graduates and post-doctoral researchers from a variety of organisations including: RMIT, La Trobe University, the University of Melbourne, Deakin University, Swinburne University, Victoria University of Technology, Monash University, the Australian Synchrotron, the Department of Environment and Primary Industries, the University of Sydney, Macquarie University, the University of New South Wales, the University of Western Australia, the Australian Institute of Health Innovation, the Westmead Millennium Institute, the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, and the Australian Institution of Marine Science.

Previous employment and clients include several years working as a computer systems trainer and database management for the Parliamentary Labor Party in Victoria. Following this he worked for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Timor Leste (East Timor) managing their computer network and providing training and technical expertise to that Ministry in their first year of self-governance. Dr. Ramos-Horta provided the following comments on his work.

Lev works for the Research Computing Services group at the University of Melbourne as the Senior High Performance Computing Development and Operations Engineer, and prior to that Victorian Partnership for Advanced Computing, as a systems administrator for Linux clusters. As per those roles, this site is mostly dedicated to issues concerning High Performance Computing, Scientific Computing and Supercomputing. Lev is involved in Linux Users of Victoria, having spent four years as President, two years as Public Officer, two years as Vice-President, a year as Treasurer and is now in his third year as an ordinary committee member. He is has a coordinating role in the annual Multicore World conference and typically take the role of MC.

The crocodile logo was designed by Victoria Jankowski. It was first used on the cover of Neon-komputadór, the first IT training manual for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in East Timor which was printed and translated by the United Nations Development Programme. The crocodile represents the Timorese people and is the emblem of their land. The integrated circuit represents their independent connectivity to the wider world.

You can also find a political site that Lev subscribes to, The Isocracy Network, a synthesis of several progressive political orientations, and RPG Review which covers his interests in roleplaying and simulation games, including as editor of the namesake journal. This includes being the author of one very ironic RPG (Papers & Paychecks) and supplement (Cow-Orkers in the Scary Devil Monastery), a co-author of another (Fox Magic, author a supplement, Rolemaster Companion VI), as well as plot and character development in the computer game Cargo. He has also been a playtester for RuneQuest, Traveller, Basic Role Playing, and Eclipse Phase.

As a naturalistic pantheist with an interfaith perspective, he manages and contributes to the Lightbringers website which includes various addresses and essays on philosophy and religion. Recently he has taken up the role of University Outreach Officer for the International Society for Philosophers.

Finally, he also has a livejournal account, which will probably be quite boring to anyone who doesn't know him personally.

That's enough of me talking about myself in the third person like Cerebus The Aardvark.

Contributing To the International HPC Certification Forum

As datasets grow in size and complexity faster than personal computational devices are able to perform more researchers seek HPC systems as a solution to their computational problems. However, many researchers lack the familiarity with the environment for HPC, and require training. As the formal education curriculum has not yet responded sufficiently to this pressure, leaving HPC centres to provide basic training.

Spartan: From Experimental Hybrid towards a Petascale Future

Previous presentations to eResearch Australiasia described the implementation of Spartan, the University of Melbourne’s general- purpose HPC system. Initially, this system was small but innovative, arguably even experimental. Features included making extensive use of cloud infrastructure for compute nodes, OpenStack for deployment, Ceph for the file system, ROCE for network, Slurm as the workload manager, EasyBuild and LMod, etc.

Book Chapter Proposal : Monitoring HPC Systems Against Compromised SSH

Objective

To describe protections and monitoring against compromised SSH keys on HPC systems.

Scope

To describe the development and application the SSH cryptographic protocol and its use HPC systems. To illustrate a prominent case example where compromised SSH credentials affected several major HPC centres in Europe. To illustrate tools and processes developed and used at the University of Melbourne to protect against SSH compromises. To suggest an "all-of-campus" common security system as a future research project.

Process Locally, Backup Remotely

Recently, a friend expressed a degree of shock that I could pull old, even very old, items of conversation from emails, Facebook messenger, etc., with apparent ease. "But I wrote that 17 years ago". They were even dismayed when I revealed that this all just stored as plain-text files, suggesting that perhaps I was like a spy, engaging in some sort of data collection on them by way of mutual conversations.

For my own part, I was equally shocked by their reaction. Another night of fitful sleep, where feelings of self-doubt percolate. Is this yet another example that I'm have some sort of alien psyche? But of course, this is not the case, as keeping old emails and the like as local text files is completely normal in computer science. All my work and professional colleagues do this.

What is the cause of this disparity between the computer scientist and the ubiquitous computer user? Once I realised that the disparity of expected behaviour was not personal, but professional, there was clarity. Essentially, the convenience of cloud technologies and their promotion of applications through Software as a Service (SaaS) has led to some very poor computational habits among general users that have significant real-world inefficiencies.

Batch Image Processing

It may initially seem counter-intuitive, but sometimes one needs to process an image file without actually viewing the image file. This is particularly the case if one has a very large number of image files and a uniform change is required. The slow process is to open the images files individually in whatever application one is using and make the changes required, save and open the next file and make the changes required, and so forth. This is time-consuming, boring, and prone to error.

Using Live Linux to Save and Recover Your Data

There are two types of people in the world; those who have lost data and those who are about to. Given that entropy will bite eventually, the objective should be to minimise data loss. Some key rules for this backup, backup often, and backup with redundancy. Whilst an article on that subject will be produced, at this stage discussion is directed to the very specific task of recovering data from old machines which may not be accessible anymore using Linux.

Notes on Installing Ubuntu 20 VM on an MS-Windows 10 Host

Some thirteen years ago I worked with Xen virtual machines as part of my day job, and gave a presentation at Linux Users of Victoria on the subject (with additional lecture notes). A few years after that I gave another presentation on the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI), itself which (indirectly) led to a post on Linux and MS-Windows 8 dual-booting. All of this now leads to a some notes on using MS-Windows as a host for Ubuntu Linux guest machines.

The Net Promoter Score: A Meaningless Flashing Light

Almost two years ago I made a short blog post about how the Net Promoter Score (NPS), commonly used in business settings, is The Most Useless Metric of All. My reasons at the time is that it doesn't capture the reasons for a low score, it doesn't differentiate between subjective values in its scores, and it is mathematically incoherent (a three-value grade from an 11-point range of 0-10).

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